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BBC Show Information & Procedures

Please check out the links below you can learn a lot about shows and be able to familiarize yourself with the way things are done and rules pertaining to shows.

How the Judge applies the Breed Standard

The judge examines each dog in the ring, and compares the dog to a picture perfect example of the BBC Breed Standard for that breed.  The Breed Standard, as approved by the Backwoods Bulldog Club, portrays a word picture of the ideal characteristics of the dog of that breed.  The judge will appraise each dog on the following;

1.  Physical structure, to include proportion, balance and the weight and height limitation.

2.  Condition of coat, teeth, nails, and overall grooming.

3.  Gait of dog as seen from the front, side, and rear.  This is the reason for the pattern the judge has you gait the dog.  Example: The triangle.

4.  Temperament: Will penalize heavily for shyness or viciousness or may even disqualify from the ring.  Also, animation of dog while being exhibited is a must.  The dog needs to display pleasure & happiness in his actions.

5.   Breed disqualifications to be considered by each standard.

6.  Handling:  A judge will judge a dog in some cases on the way the dog is handled and works with their handler.  The dog and handler must move in unison and together.

It is important that you work your dog before entering the ring, know your dogs gate and how the dog moves.

*Females in heat will NOT be allowed on the show grounds.

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Listen to the instructions given by the judge!!!

In every case of individual gaiting, be sure to move in a straight line away from, and back to the judge. Variations from straight forward movement, such a swaying or zig zaging are discouraged. Be prepared to set up your dog in a stacking position when you return to the judge.  Stop far enough away so that you will have sufficient room to set up and give the judge a full view of the dog.  Some judges want to see a natural position after the return, and at this point do not touch the dog or stack it by hand.  Most judges will tell you to let your dog stand naturally, if that is what they prefer.  If you are first in line you may want to ask.  Train your dog to assume a good stacking position by itself as it is stopped.

You must practice the various ring patterns with your dog.  This will not only familiarize you and your dog with what may be expected in the ring, but it will also give you a chance to learn the correct speed to move.  Moving too slow or too fast, may cause your dog to break stride, bounce, roll, gallop or pace, which will give an incorrect gait.  Again, the key word is PRACTICE!!!

The ideal gait is when the dogs rear feet replace the same spot where the front feet left off.  Too slow of a gait and the dogs feet fall short of meeting.  If you gate to fast, the dog’s feet cross over each other.  Have a friend watch from a distance and give you instructions.  When you reach the proper speed try to keep it the same each day you practice.  The gait may vary day to day especially with growing dogs, but you may have a friend re-examine your speed again.

General Ring Procedures

Your numbered arm band will be issued to you when you enter your dog.  If you have pre-entered your dog, you must pick up your arm band 30 minutes prior to your class starting.  The arm band is worn on the left arm.  Enter the ring as soon as your class is called and follow the instructions of the judge.  Normally, you will set up your dog, give yourself ample space between your dog and the other exhibitors dogs.  The judge should be able to walk completely around your dog if he/she so desires.  The judge may then ask the entire class to move their dogs around the ring.  When moving, do not move too fast or too slow and DO NOT run up on the dog in front of you.  The judge will have you stop at a designated place, at which time you will set up your dog for individual examination.

The individual examination of the dog generally begins with the judge making a visual inspection of the dog in its Set-Up position; first from the side, then from the front.  The judge will then ask you to show the dogs bit, then its teeth.  The judge then begins the Hands-On inspection of the dog starting from the head, rearward.  (You must hold your dog steady so the judge may complete the examination.)  The judge will check for the presence of both testicles on males.  When the judge has completed the visual and hands-on examination, you will be instructed to move your dog in a pattern (Tri-angle, ‘L’ or a ‘T’, see diagram below).  The Tri-angle pattern is most commonly used.  While moving, your dog should always be on your left-hand side, except when you find yourself between the judge and the dog, at which time you may position the dog on your right side.  Once the judge is satisfied with the movement phase of the examination, you will be directed to the rear of the line of dogs.  The judge will then begin the examination of the next dog.

When the judge has completed the individual examination of all dogs in the class, he will be ready to make his selection.  Here again, all judges have different procedures they follow, so, pay attention to the judge and follow his directions!  If your dog is picked for placement, go to the designated spot (normally, there will be signs indicating 1st , 2nd , and 3rd) so your arm band number can be entered into the judge book.  All exhibitors should congratulate each other, whether you win or not.  This is a show of good sportsmanship!!!  Accept all awards in a courteous manner.  Pay attention to the judge and follow his directions!  If you dog is picked for placement, go to the designated spot (normally, there will be signs indicating 1, 2, 3, and 5) so your arm band number can be entered into the judge book.  All exhibitors should congratulate each other, whether you win or not.  This is a show of good sportsmanship!!!  Accept all awards in a courteous manner.

The viewpoints expressed by submitters and advertisers are not necessarily the viewpoints held by the American Bulldog Journal. 

Permission for reprinting or copying must be retained in writing from the American Bulldog Journal.

The American Bulldog Journal will not knowingly or intentionally print any article or information that conflicts with the Animal Welfare Act of 1976, or any other Acts of Animal Welfare.

Copyright 2000.   All rights reserved.

 

DOG SHOW TERMS

ARM BAND: The armband is a stiff paper band bearing the number of your entry and worn in the ring around the left arm.  Band is to be picked up at the registration table before the scheduled time of breed judging.

CHALKING: Altering the natural color or texture of a dog’s coat by means of chemicals or dyes, or by using any foreign substance such as chalk, hence the name.

CHAMPION OF RECORD:  A dog having the prescribed number of points to become champion.

CONDITION: To the show exhibitor, condition means “show condition”, i.e., well-trimmed, clipped and groomed.

CONFORMATION: Form and structure; the arrangement of parts in conformance with the requirements of a Breed Standard.

CRATED: A dog confined to its crate (or benched).

FAULT: Any characteristic that deviates from the “ideal” as expressed in the Breed Standard.

FINISHED: A dog that has gained the necessary number of points for its championship is a Champion of Record.

FUN MATCH: The portrayals of a sanctioned show, with the exception that NO POINTS ARE GIVEN.  Fun matches are an excellent source of experience for a young dog and a new handler as they are conducted in the same manner as a licensed show.

QUIT: The dog and/or the exhibitor stops ‘showing’ before the judging of the class is completed.

RING STEWARD: The judge’s factotum, responsible for organizing the competitors for the judge, insuring the smooth, uninterrupted flow of classes into and out of the ring. The ring steward insures that the proper awards are available to the presented.

RUNNING SHEET:  A running sheet is a judging schedule.

SET-UP: A dog that has been stacked for conformation judging.

SOUNDNESS: A dog which has no visible defect which would interfere with its usefulness in the breed.  Unsoundness might include a bite problem, structural weakness in legs, hocks, or shoulders, showing faulty movement.

TO BE UP: To have dog mentally (attitude) prepared for exhibition.

TO PASS OVER: Not to be considered for placement for championship points. (Commonly referred to as being ’dumped’)

TO SHOW: To give an eye-catching performance during judging.

TERMS USED IN DESCRIBING MOVEMENT OF DOG

ACTION: The movement of the dog.

ANGULATION: The angle at which the bones meet at the joint; applied especially to shoulders, hip, stifle, and hock joints.

BAIT: Items used to keep a dog alert in the ring.  FOOD IS NOT ALLOWED IN THE RING AT BBC EVENTS.  Attention getters (Squeekies) MAY be allowed at the judges discretion.

BALANCE: Over-all proportion of the dog, indicating symmetry of its conformation.

CLOSE IN REAR: Moving with hocks close together, but not necessarily cow-hocked.

COVERING: Setting your dog up in such a manner as to hide another dog with your dog’s tail, head, body, or Possibly yourself.

CRABBING: Same as sidewheeling or sidewinding; moving diagonally with the feet out of line rather then in a straight line as viewed by the judge.

CROWDING: Setting a dog up too close to the dog in front of you, or in movement, running your dog into the dog in front of you.

DOUBLE HANDLING: Keeping the dog alert during the judging by having someone attracting its attention from outside the ring or by assisting the handler with signals in the handling of the dog.  THIS IS NOT ALLOWED!!!

DOWN IN PASTERN: Weak or faulty pastern joints, gives the appearance of being flat-footed.

DRIVING: A solid thrusting action of the hind quarters, denoting sound locomotion and good muscle tone.

ELBOWING OUT: Turning elbows out from the body; not held close to sides.

FLICKING PASTERNS: As extremely loose movement of the lower forelegs.

FORGING: Dog moving out too fast and ahead of the handler.

GAIT: Leg action when the dog is moving in any designated manner.

HACKNEY: An abnormally high action of the front legs; usually indicating lack of drive.

HANGING BACK: Dog pulls back on lead, making it difficult for the handler to keep the dog moving.

HOCKING: Hock joint turned in towards each other causing rear feet to turn out.

KNUCKLING OVER: Lower front leg bent out above the pastern.

LOOSE LEAD: Dog under minimum restraint, lead will have a slight loop in it.

LOOSE MOVEMENT: Erratic action due to poor muscle development.

LUMBERING: Moving in an ungainly manner.

OUT AT SHOULDERS: Loosely jointed shoulder blades.

OVERHANDLING: Fussing too much with a good step-up.  Stacking and restacking the dog unnecessarily.

PACING: Moving the legs on same side of the body simultaneously in the same direction; NOT desired.

PADDLING: A loose flicking movement of the forelegs, denoting lack of reach.

PIGEON TOEING: Toes turning in or pointing toward each other.

PLUME: Feather tail carried over back.

POKING: To carry the neck stretched forward in an abnormally low, ungainly position when moving.

REACH OF FRONT: The length of forward stride taken by the forelegs without excessive or wasted motion.

RINGTAIL: Tail carried up and around the back line, almost in a circle.

ROLLING GAIT:  Swaying, ambling action of the hind quarters while moving.

SET UP: Stacking, or posting a dog.

SHOWN FREE: Refers to a dog being handled on a loose lead.

TO BE UP: To have dog mentally (attitude) prepared for exhibition.

TO PASS OVER: Not to be considered for placement for championship points. (Commonly referred to as being ‘dumped’).

TO SHOW: To give an eye-catching performance during judging.

SIDEWHEELING: Moving diagonally, with the feet out of line, also referred to as “crabbing” or “sidewinding”. Not desirable, as it prevents a good view of the dogs’ front or rear action.

SPARRING: Allowing two dogs to face-up to each other to test their ‘spirit’; usually done by Terrier judges. NOT ALLOWED IN BBC.

SPINNER: A dog that continually spins around in a tight circle.

STACKING: Posing the dog in such a way as to improve or emphasize its appearance.

STRUNG UP: A dog held on an abnormally tight lead, either while moving or in a stationary position.

THROWING: Dog is usually moving too fast, throwing the rear legs out to the side instead of straight back.

TOP AND TAIL: To show a dog while holding in on a short lead with one hand and by the tail with the other hand.

TO SHOW: To give an eye-catching performance during judging.

UPSTAGING: Setting your dog out farther in line; or at the edge of the mat to conceal the following dog.  When class is moving around the ring, allowing your dog to move out of line and along side of the dog in front of you in order to conceal the judges view of the dog in front of you.

WEAVING: Dog not moving in a straight line while gaiting, roaming side to side while in a forward motion.